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Making It Count
Breathe Project coalition partners are taking actions that add up to cleaner air.
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Energy Efficiency

Reducing power consumption lowers the amount of fossil fuels burned to provide electricity, which in turn, reduces harmful air emissions. Breathe Project coalition partners are taking big steps to reduce their energy use to help improve our region’s air quality.

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Transportation

On-road sources account for roughly 15 percent of the fine particle pollution in southwestern Pennsylvania, according to 2013 National Emissions Inventory data. Breathe Project partners are working to reduce single-occupancy vehicle trips and to encourage the use of public transportation, carpooling and bicycles.

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Renewable Energy

Renewable energy—wind, solar, geothermal, and hydroelectric—provides substantial benefits for our health and economy. Breathe Project partners are choosing to power their homes and businesses with these energy technologies to help clean our air.

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Industry

Clean Air Task Force analysis finds that one-half to two-thirds of the particulate matter in Pittsburgh comes from Pennsylvania sources, with a large fraction coming from local industrial facilities. Breathe Project coalition partners are installing better pollution controls on their factories and using greener manufacturing processes.

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Diesel

Diesel exhaust is a major source of air pollution in the Pittsburgh region and poses a serious health risk. To reduce harmful diesel emissions, Breathe Project coalition partners are avoiding idling, retrofitting diesel engines with pollution control devices and purchasing cleaner trucks, buses and construction equipment.

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Other Reductions

Whether it's running a bounty program for old, dirty woodstoves or launching an initiative to exchange gas-powered lawnmowers for cleaner electric models, Breathe Project coalition partners are taking other important steps to help reduce harmful air emissions.

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*Tons per year of particulate matter. Emissions reduction calculations submitted to the Breathe Project by coalition partners and others.

How you can help

Whether it’s installing factory pollution controls, launching an employee program to encourage carpooling, or outfitting a Downtown skyscraper with energy-efficient windows, Breathe Project coalition partners are taking actions that improve our air quality.


Collectively, their emissions reductions are adding up to cleaner air in southwestern Pennsylvania.


Is your business or workplace taking steps to reduce air pollution? Click below to tell us how and to make your hard work count.


And check back often to watch these numbers grow.

MAKE IT COUNT
Success Stories
Viewing:
May 5, 2014
Energy Efficiency: Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge

  The Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge is a free, yearlong competition for organizations to save money and gain recognition for energy saving and other green initiatives. Through the Green Workplace Challenge, participants track and measure improvements in the areas of … Continue reading

Continue Reading

 

The Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge is a free, yearlong competition for organizations to save money and gain recognition for energy saving and other green initiatives. Through the Green Workplace Challenge, participants track and measure improvements in the areas of energy, water, waste and transportation. Points are earned based on actions taken. In 2013-2014, more than 100 businesses, nonprofits, municipalities and colleges/universities are participating in the challenge.

 

As of early May, with a month left in the competition, these leading organizations have taken more than 1,027 total actions that have saved more than 50 million kWh of electricity worth approximately $3.31 million—enough to power all the households in East Allegheny, Friendship, Manchester, Regent Square and Polish Hill for a year.

 

Saving water also saves energy, which means less air pollution created through the combustion of fossil fuels. Green Workplace Challenge participants have also saved more than 13.1 million gallons of water so far—the amount used in 138 typical U.S. households in a year.

 

Through their collective actions, these organizations have reduced emissions of fine particulate matter in the Pittsburgh region by 3.8 tons. In addition, they’ve reduced emissions of NOx by 30.4 tons; SO2 by 148.3 tons; and mercury by 2.22 pounds.

 

Stay tuned for final numbers from the competition!

 
Source: Sustainable Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge

Close Story
May 5, 2014
Transportation: Port Authority Fleet Cleaning Up

  Harmful air emissions from Port Authority of Allegheny County diesel-powered buses have fallen dramatically since 2005 as new, cleaner buses were purchased and older, dirtier buses were retired, according to a new report from MJ. Bradley & Associates. These … Continue reading

Continue Reading

 

Harmful air emissions from Port Authority of Allegheny County diesel-powered buses have fallen dramatically since 2005 as new, cleaner buses were purchased and older, dirtier buses were retired, according to a new report from MJ. Bradley & Associates. These improvements are expected to continue over the next six years based on planned future new bus purchases.

 

The report found that between 2005 and 2013, estimated total annual emissions of particulate matter (PM) from the Port Authority bus fleet fell by 7.7 tons—that’s a reduction of 66 percent. During that same time, emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from the fleet fell by 553 tons—a 72 percent reduction.

 

Also good news is the report’s findings that 43 percent of PM reductions and 53 percent of NOx reductions were due to retirement of old buses and replacement with cleaner equipment. Today, there are 685 buses operating, and the newer buses have cleaner engines certified to meet more stringent EPA emission standards than the older buses they replaced; average emissions of PM and NOx from the newest diesel buses in the fleet are 90 percent and 96 percent lower, respectively, than for the oldest buses in the 2005 fleet.

 

In 2010, Port Authority also repowered nine model-year 2003 buses with new, cleaner engines. This retrofit project will result in a reduction of 0.42 tons of particulate matter and 10.56 tons of NOx between 2010 and 2016. Port Authority also operates 32 hybrid diesel-electric buses that get about 25 percent better fuel economy than similar diesel buses.

 

Unfortunately, a portion of the emissions reductions from 2005 to 2013 is attributable to a reduction in annual fleet mileage by Port Authority buses, which fell by roughly 41 percent in the study period. Approximately 23 percent of the reduction in PM emissions and 19 percent of the reduction in NOx emissions came from service cuts.

 

But over the next six years, annual fleet mileage is expected to stay fairly steady—and the future outlook is bright when it comes to emissions reductions.

 

Based on projected deliveries of new buses and retirement of old buses, both PM and NOx emissions should continue to fall over the next six years. By 2019, annual PM and NOx are projected to fall by 90 percent and 95 percent, respectively, compared to the 2005 baseline—and for the right reasons.

 

Modeling indicates that 70 percent of the cumulative PM reductions and 77 percent of the cumulative NOx reductions between 2005 and 2019 will be due to fleet turnover to cleaner buses and engines rather than cuts in fleet mileage.

 

In fact, by 2019, all of the Port Authority buses are projected to meet the most stringent EPA PM standards—and 86 percent are projected to meet the most stringent NOx standards.

 

 

Source: Port Authority of Allegheny County Bus Fleet Emissions, 2005-2019, M.J. Bradley & Associates, LLC, February 2014

 

Close Story
May 5, 2014
Diesel: Port of Pittsburgh Commission Marine Repower Project

  When we think of diesel emissions, we usually picture black smoke billowing from a truck or school bus. While that unfortunately occurs quite often, a significant amount of diesel pollution in Allegheny County also comes from river vessels. In … Continue reading

Continue Reading

 

When we think of diesel emissions, we usually picture black smoke billowing from a truck or school bus. While that unfortunately occurs quite often, a significant amount of diesel pollution in Allegheny County also comes from river vessels. In fact, the Port of Pittsburgh is considered the second busiest inland part in the U.S., moving 30 to 40 million tons of cargo each year.

 

A $1.1 million Diesel Emissions Reduction Act grant awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2010 is helping to reduce diesel pollution from our three rivers. The grant allowed the Port of Pittsburgh Commission to oversee extensive repowering of four marine towing vessels (8 engines) with new, more fuel-efficient diesel engines and generators that will reduce air pollution. The Port of Pittsburgh and three private companies—Campbell Transportation Company, Consol Energy and River Salvage, Inc.—more than matched the EPA grant with $1.97 million.

 

The project cut 5 tons a year of particulate matter, 112 tons of nitrous oxide, 15 tons of carbon monoxide and two tons of hydrocarbons from our air, according to Group Against Smog and Pollution.

 

Source: Reducing Pollution From Diesel Engines in Pittsburgh: Yesterday, Today and for the Future, 2010

 

Close Story
May 5, 2014
Energy Efficiency: Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge Read More

 

The Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge is a free, yearlong competition for organizations to save money and gain recognition for energy saving and other green initiatives. Through the Green Workplace Challenge, participants track and measure improvements in the areas of energy, water, waste and transportation. Points are earned based on actions taken. In 2013-2014, more than 100 businesses, nonprofits, municipalities and colleges/universities are participating in the challenge.

 

As of early May, with a month left in the competition, these leading organizations have taken more than 1,027 total actions that have saved more than 50 million kWh of electricity worth approximately $3.31 million—enough to power all the households in East Allegheny, Friendship, Manchester, Regent Square and Polish Hill for a year.

 

Saving water also saves energy, which means less air pollution created through the combustion of fossil fuels. Green Workplace Challenge participants have also saved more than 13.1 million gallons of water so far—the amount used in 138 typical U.S. households in a year.

 

Through their collective actions, these organizations have reduced emissions of fine particulate matter in the Pittsburgh region by 3.8 tons. In addition, they’ve reduced emissions of NOx by 30.4 tons; SO2 by 148.3 tons; and mercury by 2.22 pounds.

 

Stay tuned for final numbers from the competition!

 
Source: Sustainable Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge

Close Story
May 5, 2014
Transportation: Port Authority Fleet Cleaning Up Read More

 

Harmful air emissions from Port Authority of Allegheny County diesel-powered buses have fallen dramatically since 2005 as new, cleaner buses were purchased and older, dirtier buses were retired, according to a new report from MJ. Bradley & Associates. These improvements are expected to continue over the next six years based on planned future new bus purchases.

 

The report found that between 2005 and 2013, estimated total annual emissions of particulate matter (PM) from the Port Authority bus fleet fell by 7.7 tons—that’s a reduction of 66 percent. During that same time, emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from the fleet fell by 553 tons—a 72 percent reduction.

 

Also good news is the report’s findings that 43 percent of PM reductions and 53 percent of NOx reductions were due to retirement of old buses and replacement with cleaner equipment. Today, there are 685 buses operating, and the newer buses have cleaner engines certified to meet more stringent EPA emission standards than the older buses they replaced; average emissions of PM and NOx from the newest diesel buses in the fleet are 90 percent and 96 percent lower, respectively, than for the oldest buses in the 2005 fleet.

 

In 2010, Port Authority also repowered nine model-year 2003 buses with new, cleaner engines. This retrofit project will result in a reduction of 0.42 tons of particulate matter and 10.56 tons of NOx between 2010 and 2016. Port Authority also operates 32 hybrid diesel-electric buses that get about 25 percent better fuel economy than similar diesel buses.

 

Unfortunately, a portion of the emissions reductions from 2005 to 2013 is attributable to a reduction in annual fleet mileage by Port Authority buses, which fell by roughly 41 percent in the study period. Approximately 23 percent of the reduction in PM emissions and 19 percent of the reduction in NOx emissions came from service cuts.

 

But over the next six years, annual fleet mileage is expected to stay fairly steady—and the future outlook is bright when it comes to emissions reductions.

 

Based on projected deliveries of new buses and retirement of old buses, both PM and NOx emissions should continue to fall over the next six years. By 2019, annual PM and NOx are projected to fall by 90 percent and 95 percent, respectively, compared to the 2005 baseline—and for the right reasons.

 

Modeling indicates that 70 percent of the cumulative PM reductions and 77 percent of the cumulative NOx reductions between 2005 and 2019 will be due to fleet turnover to cleaner buses and engines rather than cuts in fleet mileage.

 

In fact, by 2019, all of the Port Authority buses are projected to meet the most stringent EPA PM standards—and 86 percent are projected to meet the most stringent NOx standards.

 

 

Source: Port Authority of Allegheny County Bus Fleet Emissions, 2005-2019, M.J. Bradley & Associates, LLC, February 2014

 

Close Story
May 5, 2014
Diesel: Port of Pittsburgh Commission Marine Repower Project Read More

 

When we think of diesel emissions, we usually picture black smoke billowing from a truck or school bus. While that unfortunately occurs quite often, a significant amount of diesel pollution in Allegheny County also comes from river vessels. In fact, the Port of Pittsburgh is considered the second busiest inland part in the U.S., moving 30 to 40 million tons of cargo each year.

 

A $1.1 million Diesel Emissions Reduction Act grant awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2010 is helping to reduce diesel pollution from our three rivers. The grant allowed the Port of Pittsburgh Commission to oversee extensive repowering of four marine towing vessels (8 engines) with new, more fuel-efficient diesel engines and generators that will reduce air pollution. The Port of Pittsburgh and three private companies—Campbell Transportation Company, Consol Energy and River Salvage, Inc.—more than matched the EPA grant with $1.97 million.

 

The project cut 5 tons a year of particulate matter, 112 tons of nitrous oxide, 15 tons of carbon monoxide and two tons of hydrocarbons from our air, according to Group Against Smog and Pollution.

 

Source: Reducing Pollution From Diesel Engines in Pittsburgh: Yesterday, Today and for the Future, 2010

 

Close Story
May 5, 2014
Energy Efficiency: Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge

  The Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge is a free, yearlong competition for organizations to save money and gain recognition for energy saving and other green initiatives. Through the Green Workplace Challenge, participants track and measure improvements in the areas of … Continue reading

Continue Reading

 

The Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge is a free, yearlong competition for organizations to save money and gain recognition for energy saving and other green initiatives. Through the Green Workplace Challenge, participants track and measure improvements in the areas of energy, water, waste and transportation. Points are earned based on actions taken. In 2013-2014, more than 100 businesses, nonprofits, municipalities and colleges/universities are participating in the challenge.

 

As of early May, with a month left in the competition, these leading organizations have taken more than 1,027 total actions that have saved more than 50 million kWh of electricity worth approximately $3.31 million—enough to power all the households in East Allegheny, Friendship, Manchester, Regent Square and Polish Hill for a year.

 

Saving water also saves energy, which means less air pollution created through the combustion of fossil fuels. Green Workplace Challenge participants have also saved more than 13.1 million gallons of water so far—the amount used in 138 typical U.S. households in a year.

 

Through their collective actions, these organizations have reduced emissions of fine particulate matter in the Pittsburgh region by 3.8 tons. In addition, they’ve reduced emissions of NOx by 30.4 tons; SO2 by 148.3 tons; and mercury by 2.22 pounds.

 

Stay tuned for final numbers from the competition!

 
Source: Sustainable Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Green Workplace Challenge

Close Story
May 5, 2014
Transportation: Port Authority Fleet Cleaning Up

  Harmful air emissions from Port Authority of Allegheny County diesel-powered buses have fallen dramatically since 2005 as new, cleaner buses were purchased and older, dirtier buses were retired, according to a new report from MJ. Bradley & Associates. These … Continue reading

Continue Reading

 

Harmful air emissions from Port Authority of Allegheny County diesel-powered buses have fallen dramatically since 2005 as new, cleaner buses were purchased and older, dirtier buses were retired, according to a new report from MJ. Bradley & Associates. These improvements are expected to continue over the next six years based on planned future new bus purchases.

 

The report found that between 2005 and 2013, estimated total annual emissions of particulate matter (PM) from the Port Authority bus fleet fell by 7.7 tons—that’s a reduction of 66 percent. During that same time, emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from the fleet fell by 553 tons—a 72 percent reduction.

 

Also good news is the report’s findings that 43 percent of PM reductions and 53 percent of NOx reductions were due to retirement of old buses and replacement with cleaner equipment. Today, there are 685 buses operating, and the newer buses have cleaner engines certified to meet more stringent EPA emission standards than the older buses they replaced; average emissions of PM and NOx from the newest diesel buses in the fleet are 90 percent and 96 percent lower, respectively, than for the oldest buses in the 2005 fleet.

 

In 2010, Port Authority also repowered nine model-year 2003 buses with new, cleaner engines. This retrofit project will result in a reduction of 0.42 tons of particulate matter and 10.56 tons of NOx between 2010 and 2016. Port Authority also operates 32 hybrid diesel-electric buses that get about 25 percent better fuel economy than similar diesel buses.

 

Unfortunately, a portion of the emissions reductions from 2005 to 2013 is attributable to a reduction in annual fleet mileage by Port Authority buses, which fell by roughly 41 percent in the study period. Approximately 23 percent of the reduction in PM emissions and 19 percent of the reduction in NOx emissions came from service cuts.

 

But over the next six years, annual fleet mileage is expected to stay fairly steady—and the future outlook is bright when it comes to emissions reductions.

 

Based on projected deliveries of new buses and retirement of old buses, both PM and NOx emissions should continue to fall over the next six years. By 2019, annual PM and NOx are projected to fall by 90 percent and 95 percent, respectively, compared to the 2005 baseline—and for the right reasons.

 

Modeling indicates that 70 percent of the cumulative PM reductions and 77 percent of the cumulative NOx reductions between 2005 and 2019 will be due to fleet turnover to cleaner buses and engines rather than cuts in fleet mileage.

 

In fact, by 2019, all of the Port Authority buses are projected to meet the most stringent EPA PM standards—and 86 percent are projected to meet the most stringent NOx standards.

 

 

Source: Port Authority of Allegheny County Bus Fleet Emissions, 2005-2019, M.J. Bradley & Associates, LLC, February 2014

 

Close Story

There are no success stories in this category.

There are no success stories in this category.

May 5, 2014
Diesel: Port of Pittsburgh Commission Marine Repower Project

  When we think of diesel emissions, we usually picture black smoke billowing from a truck or school bus. While that unfortunately occurs quite often, a significant amount of diesel pollution in Allegheny County also comes from river vessels. In … Continue reading

Continue Reading

 

When we think of diesel emissions, we usually picture black smoke billowing from a truck or school bus. While that unfortunately occurs quite often, a significant amount of diesel pollution in Allegheny County also comes from river vessels. In fact, the Port of Pittsburgh is considered the second busiest inland part in the U.S., moving 30 to 40 million tons of cargo each year.

 

A $1.1 million Diesel Emissions Reduction Act grant awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2010 is helping to reduce diesel pollution from our three rivers. The grant allowed the Port of Pittsburgh Commission to oversee extensive repowering of four marine towing vessels (8 engines) with new, more fuel-efficient diesel engines and generators that will reduce air pollution. The Port of Pittsburgh and three private companies—Campbell Transportation Company, Consol Energy and River Salvage, Inc.—more than matched the EPA grant with $1.97 million.

 

The project cut 5 tons a year of particulate matter, 112 tons of nitrous oxide, 15 tons of carbon monoxide and two tons of hydrocarbons from our air, according to Group Against Smog and Pollution.

 

Source: Reducing Pollution From Diesel Engines in Pittsburgh: Yesterday, Today and for the Future, 2010

 

Close Story

There are no success stories in this category.

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